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23rd Annual Archdiocesan Young Adult Appreciation Banquet

We are proud to announce that Saturday, January 20, 2018 marks our 23rd Annual Archdiocese of Santa Fe Roman Catholic Young Adult Appreciation Banquet. This is a wonderful time for Archdiocesan parishes to recognize and affirm the outstanding service that young adults provide. Many parishes are blessed with young adult’s acts of faith in action.

We invite all parishes to submit two of their outstanding young adults (ages 18 out of high School – 30) to receive a Certificate of Appreciation at the Annual Young Adult Appreciation Banquet. The Certificate of Appreciation is awarded to young adults from the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries.

Please See Attached Recipient Form YA RECIPIENT FORM 2018

 

Young Adults are commonly found serving their parishes as Extraordinary Ministers of the Most Holy Eucharist, Ushers, Lectors, participating in Choirs, Catechists, Youth and Young Adult Ministers, serving in Social Justice Projects, and many other ministries.

Please prayerfully reflect on where young adults are serving in your parish community. Once you have chosen two young adults, who deserve to receive the Certificate of Appreciation, please fill out the attached recipient forms and return them back to the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries. We request that the nomination forms be returned by Monday, January 8, 2018. We also request that you personally inform your recipients of the Appreciation Banquet.

 

The Annual Young Adult Appreciation Banquet is Saturday, January 20, 2018 at the Catholic Center, 4000 St. Joseph’s Pl NW Albuquerque, NM 87120. The event begins at 4:00 PM with check-in. Sunday obligation Mass begins at 5:00 PM, Dinner at 6:00 PM and followed by the Appreciation Ceremony at 7:00 PM. Attire is Business Casual.

The Appreciation Dinner is a gift to the recipients from the Archdiocese of Santa Fe Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries for their outstanding service to the Archdiocese. They may bring a guest (no more than two guests per nominee, also this is an adult event) and this year we have a reserved a seat for the Pastor and Young Adult Minister of their parish which will also be considered quests. There will be a charge for all guest’s, pastors and minister’s meals at $15 per guest(s). Please note Due to assigned seating we will not take any registrations at the door.

Please call the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries for more information at (505) 831-8142 or email dmontano@archdiosf.org

 

Minute Meditations from Franciscan Media

 

We Belong to God | Image: Pixabay

When you take the full measure of yourself, in Christ, you, too, know your infinite value to the rest of the world, even if the world never knows or sees one thing about you. Every hair on your head is numbered. You are worth more than you know because you have lusts and longings and desires. Unto death and out of love, you consent to hold the tension of the conflict. And your infinite value doesn’t cease when you die. It lives on, into eternity.

 

SAINT OF THE DAY

 See the source image

Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne

Saint of the Day for November 20

(August 29, 1769 – November 18, 1852)

https://wp.franciscanmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/SODNov20.mp3

 

Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne’s Story

Born in Grenoble, France, of a family that was among the new rich, Rose learned political skills from her father and a love of the poor from her mother. The dominant feature of her temperament was a strong and dauntless will, which became the material—and the battlefield—of her holiness. She entered the Visitation of Mary convent at 19, and remained despite family opposition. As the French Revolution broke, the convent was closed, and she began taking care of the poor and sick, opened a school for homeless children, and risked her life helping priests in the underground.

When the situation cooled, Rose personally rented the former convent, now a shambles, and tried to revive its religious life. The spirit was gone, however, and soon there were only four nuns left. They joined the infant Society of the Sacred Heart, whose young superior, Mother Madeleine Sophie Barat, would be her lifelong friend.

In a short time Rose was a superior and supervisor of the novitiate and a school. But since hearing tales of missionary work in Louisiana as a little girl, her ambition was to go to America and work among the Indians. At 49, she thought this would be her work. With four nuns, she spent 11 weeks at sea en route to New Orleans, and seven weeks more on the Mississippi to St. Louis. She then met one of the many disappointments of her life. The bishop had no place for them to live and work among Native Americans. Instead, he sent her to what she sadly called “the remotest village in the U.S.,” St. Charles, Missouri. With characteristic drive and courage, she founded the first free school for girls west of the Mississippi.

It was a mistake. Though Rose was as hardy as any of the pioneer women in the wagons rolling west, cold and hunger drove them out—to Florissant, Missouri, where she founded the first Catholic Indian school, adding others in the territory.

“In her first decade in America, Mother Duchesne suffered practically every hardship the frontier had to offer, except the threat of Indian massacre—poor lodging, shortages of food, drinking water, fuel and money, forest fires and blazing chimneys, the vagaries of the Missouri climate, cramped living quarters and the privation of all privacy, and the crude manners of children reared in rough surroundings and with only the slightest training in courtesy” (Louise Callan, R.S.C.J., Philippine Duchesne).

Finally at age 72, retired and in poor health, Rose got her lifelong wish. A mission was founded at Sugar Creek, Kansas, among the Potawatomi and she was taken along. Though she could not learn their language, they soon named her “Woman-Who-Prays-Always.” While others taught, she prayed. Legend has it that Native American children sneaked behind her as she knelt and sprinkled bits of paper on her habit, and came back hours later to find them undisturbed. Rose Philippine died in 1852, at the age of 83, and was canonized in 1988.

Reflection

Divine grace channeled Mother Duchesne’s iron will and determination into humility and selflessness, and to a desire not to be made superior. Still, even saints can get involved in silly situations. In an argument with her over a minor change in the sanctuary, a priest threatened to remove the tabernacle. She patiently let herself be criticized by younger nuns for not being progressive enough. For 31 years, she hewed to the line of a dauntless love and an unshakable observance of her religious vows.

The Liturgical Feast of Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne is November 18.

Why Do Catholics Make the Sign of the Cross

The first prayer that most parents teach their children is the Sign of the Cross. This ancient gestural prayer customarily begins and ends our formal prayer, from grace before meals to the Church’s principal prayer, the Mass. According to the 1911 edition of the Catholic Encyclopedia, the ancient origin of the Sign of the Cross is unclear, but its form has evolved over time: It’s now a large gesture rather than a small one; uses three fingers instead of two, and goes from left-to-right instead of right-to-left. Continue reading Why Do Catholics Make the Sign of the Cross

YOUNG ADULT UPCOMING EVENTS

Young Adult Events Can Also Be Seen On Their Facebook site:

Young Adult Facebook: facebook.com/asfyoungadults

 Or Download the Young Adult App to also get this infomation

Link: http://myapp.parishapps.com/C%20Squared%20ASF

 

 

Taize Prayer Service                                                                                                 (open to all ages and all Christian Denominations)

Date:  Friday, November 17, 2017

Time:  7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Place: Norbertine Abbey 5825 Coors Blvd. SW Alb. NM 87121

No fee, Do not need to register

Taize-November

Young Adult Christ in the Community

 Date:  Friday December 1, 2017

Time:  5:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Place: Old Town Holiday Stroll

Young Adult Advent Retreat

Date:  Saturday December 2, 2017

Time:  8:30 am – 6:30 pm

Place: Norbertine Abbey 5825 Coors Blvd. SW Alb. NM 87121

Registration Link: https://secure.acceptiva.com/?cst=f96fdb

Advent Retreat-December

Advent Movie Night

Taize Prayer Service                                                                                                  (open to all ages and all Christian Denominations)

Date:  Friday, December 15, 2017

Time:  7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Place: Norbertine Abbey 5825 Coors Blvd. SW Alb. NM 87121

No fee, Do not need to register

Taize-December

2018 Archdiocesan Confirmation Retreats

Archdiocesan High School Confirmation Retreats

 

These  retreats are designed especially for your confirmation youth as they journey into discipleship and prepare to receive their sacrament of Confirmation. Mass and Reconciliation will also be celebrated.

Below are the dates for the three confirmation retreats. Registration forms are below:

IMPORTANT: Please register early since space is very limited and we fill up all three retreats at least 1 month before the deadline of the February Retreat. Reserve your spots as soon as possible.

Please Note: Every youth must have an adult chaperone over the age of 21 and have attended the Abuse Awareness workshop. There is an acceptance if the youth is being accompanied by their parent or if they are coming as a group from their parish then the minister has already attended the workshop.
For Group registrations the adult ration is one adult for every six youth and chaperone must carry completed permission forms for each youth at retreat.
4000 St. Joseph Pl. NW Albuquerque NM 87120
  • 9:00 am is check-in
  • Retreat begins promptly at 9:30 am and ends at 3:00 pm
  • Fee: is 15.00 per person( chaperone will also need to pay)

Saturday February 17, 2018

2018 Confirmation Retreat Registration 2.17.18

Saturday March 17, 2018

2018 Confirmation Retreat Registration 3.17.18

Saturday April 14, 2018 (2nd Year Confirmation Only)

2018 Confirmation Retreat Registration 4.14.18

Please Note: The April 14th retreat will be for 2nd Year Confirmation.  We can put others on the waiting list.

Please contact Della @ (505) 831-8142 or dmontano@archdiosf.org for cancellations or to be put on a waiting list.

Why do we Kneel?

Why Do Catholic Kneel

Kneeling: Kneeling is the most profound sign of reverence and Roman Catholics kneel at the most sacred points of the Mass. In the United States, Catholics kneel throughout the Eucharistic Prayer, but in Europe and elsewhere, they’re only obligated to kneel during the Consecration. Eastern Catholics, such as the Byzantine, don’t kneel because standing is their normal posture for reverence.

Why Do We Practice Fasting & Abstinence?

Explain that Lent is the 40 days before Easter in which Catholics pray, fast, contemplate, and engage in acts of spiritual self-discipline. Catholics do these things because Easter, which celebrates the Resurrection of Christ, is the greatest holy day of the Christian year (even above Christmas) and Catholics have recognized that it is appropriate to prepare for such a holy day by engaging in such disciplines.

(Archbishop Fulton Sheen noted that the Protestant attitude is summarized by the line, “First comes the feast, then comes the hangover,” while the Catholic attitude is “First comes the fast, then comes the feast.”)

The reason Lent lasts 40 days is that 40 is the traditional number of judgment and spiritual testing in the Bible (Gn 7:4, Ex 24:18, 34:28, Nm 13:25, 14:33, Jon 3:4). Lent bears particular relationship to the 40 days Christ spent fasting in the desert before entering into his public ministry (Mt 4:1-11). Catholics imitate Christ by spending 40 days in spiritual discipline before the celebration of Christ’s triumph over sin and death.

Fasting is a biblical discipline that can be defended from both the Old and the New Testament. Christ expected his disciples to fast (Mt 9:14-15) and issued instructions for how they should do so (Mt 6:16-18). Catholics follow this pattern by holding a partial fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.

Abstinence from certain foods is also a biblical discipline. In Daniel 10:2-3 we read, “In those days I, Daniel, was mourning for three weeks. I ate no delicacies, no meat or wine entered my mouth, nor did I anoint myself at all, for the full three weeks.” Catholics use a practice similar to Daniel’s when, as a way of commemorating Christ’s Crucifixion on a Friday, they abstain from eating meat on that day of the week during Lent. The only kind of flesh they eat on Friday is fish, which is a symbol of Christ.

Even the Ash Wednesday practice of having one’s forehead signed with ashes has a biblical parallel. Putting ashes on one’s head was a common biblical expression of mourning (1 Sm 13:19, Est 4:1, Is 61:3; see also Est 4:3, Jer 6:26, Ez 27:30, Dn 9:3, Mt 11:21, Lk 10:13). By having the sign of the cross made with ashes on their foreheads, Catholics mourn Christ’s suffering on the cross and their own sins, which made that suffering necessary.