Minute Meditations from Franciscan Media

The Tiniest Miracles in God's Creation | Image: Pixabay

 

 

Christmas can become a celebration of artifice and manufactured wonders. From the dangling icicle lights along the roofline to the inflatable cartoon characters on suburban lawns, we run the risk of treating this holiday as a time of one-upping not only the neighbors but also God. But we know deep down that no factory in China can produce something as wonderful as the tiniest miracle in God’s creation.

—from The Peace of Christmas: Quiet Reflections from Pope Francis
by Diane M. Houdek

 

 

SAINT OF THE DAY

 See the source image

Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception

Saint of the Day for December 8

https://wp.franciscanmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/SODDec08.mp3

 

The Story of the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception

A feast called the Conception of Mary arose in the Eastern Church in the seventh century. It came to the West in the eighth century. In the 11th century it received its present name, the Immaculate Conception. In the 18th century it became a feast of the universal Church. It is now recognized as a solemnity. Continue reading SAINT OF THE DAY

23rd Annual Archdiocesan Young Adult Appreciation Banquet

We are proud to announce that Saturday, January 20, 2018 marks our 23rd Annual Archdiocese of Santa Fe Roman Catholic Young Adult Appreciation Banquet. This is a wonderful time for Archdiocesan parishes to recognize and affirm the outstanding service that young adults provide. Many parishes are blessed with young adult’s acts of faith in action.

We invite all parishes to submit two of their outstanding young adults (ages 18 out of high School – 30) to receive a Certificate of Appreciation at the Annual Young Adult Appreciation Banquet. The Certificate of Appreciation is awarded to young adults from the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries.

Please See Attached Recipient Form YA RECIPIENT FORM 2018

 

Young Adults are commonly found serving their parishes as Extraordinary Ministers of the Most Holy Eucharist, Ushers, Lectors, participating in Choirs, Catechists, Youth and Young Adult Ministers, serving in Social Justice Projects, and many other ministries.

Please prayerfully reflect on where young adults are serving in your parish community. Once you have chosen two young adults, who deserve to receive the Certificate of Appreciation, please fill out the attached recipient forms and return them back to the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries. We request that the nomination forms be returned by Monday, January 8, 2018. We also request that you personally inform your recipients of the Appreciation Banquet.

 

The Annual Young Adult Appreciation Banquet is Saturday, January 20, 2018 at the Catholic Center, 4000 St. Joseph’s Pl NW Albuquerque, NM 87120. The event begins at 4:00 PM with check-in. Sunday obligation Mass begins at 5:00 PM, Dinner at 6:00 PM and followed by the Appreciation Ceremony at 7:00 PM. Attire is Business Casual.

The Appreciation Dinner is a gift to the recipients from the Archdiocese of Santa Fe Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries for their outstanding service to the Archdiocese. They may bring a guest (no more than two guests per nominee, also this is an adult event) and this year we have a reserved a seat for the Pastor and Young Adult Minister of their parish which will also be considered quests. There will be a charge for all guest’s, pastors and minister’s meals at $15 per guest(s). Please note Due to assigned seating we will not take any registrations at the door.

Please call the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries for more information at (505) 831-8142 or email dmontano@archdiosf.org

 

YOUNG ADULT UPCOMING EVENTS

Young Adult Events Can Also Be Seen On Their Facebook site:

Young Adult Facebook: facebook.com/asfyoungadults

 Or Download the Young Adult App to also get this infomation

Link: http://myapp.parishapps.com/C%20Squared%20ASF

 

Advent Movie Night

Taize Prayer Service                                                                                                  (open to all ages and all Christian Denominations)

Date:  Friday, December 15, 2017

Time:  7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Place: Norbertine Abbey 5825 Coors Blvd. SW Alb. NM 87121

No fee, Do not need to register

Taize-December

Why Do Catholics Make the Sign of the Cross

The first prayer that most parents teach their children is the Sign of the Cross. This ancient gestural prayer customarily begins and ends our formal prayer, from grace before meals to the Church’s principal prayer, the Mass. According to the 1911 edition of the Catholic Encyclopedia, the ancient origin of the Sign of the Cross is unclear, but its form has evolved over time: It’s now a large gesture rather than a small one; uses three fingers instead of two, and goes from left-to-right instead of right-to-left. Continue reading Why Do Catholics Make the Sign of the Cross

Why do we Kneel?

Why Do Catholic Kneel

Kneeling: Kneeling is the most profound sign of reverence and Roman Catholics kneel at the most sacred points of the Mass. In the United States, Catholics kneel throughout the Eucharistic Prayer, but in Europe and elsewhere, they’re only obligated to kneel during the Consecration. Eastern Catholics, such as the Byzantine, don’t kneel because standing is their normal posture for reverence.

Why Do We Practice Fasting & Abstinence?

Explain that Lent is the 40 days before Easter in which Catholics pray, fast, contemplate, and engage in acts of spiritual self-discipline. Catholics do these things because Easter, which celebrates the Resurrection of Christ, is the greatest holy day of the Christian year (even above Christmas) and Catholics have recognized that it is appropriate to prepare for such a holy day by engaging in such disciplines.

(Archbishop Fulton Sheen noted that the Protestant attitude is summarized by the line, “First comes the feast, then comes the hangover,” while the Catholic attitude is “First comes the fast, then comes the feast.”)

The reason Lent lasts 40 days is that 40 is the traditional number of judgment and spiritual testing in the Bible (Gn 7:4, Ex 24:18, 34:28, Nm 13:25, 14:33, Jon 3:4). Lent bears particular relationship to the 40 days Christ spent fasting in the desert before entering into his public ministry (Mt 4:1-11). Catholics imitate Christ by spending 40 days in spiritual discipline before the celebration of Christ’s triumph over sin and death.

Fasting is a biblical discipline that can be defended from both the Old and the New Testament. Christ expected his disciples to fast (Mt 9:14-15) and issued instructions for how they should do so (Mt 6:16-18). Catholics follow this pattern by holding a partial fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.

Abstinence from certain foods is also a biblical discipline. In Daniel 10:2-3 we read, “In those days I, Daniel, was mourning for three weeks. I ate no delicacies, no meat or wine entered my mouth, nor did I anoint myself at all, for the full three weeks.” Catholics use a practice similar to Daniel’s when, as a way of commemorating Christ’s Crucifixion on a Friday, they abstain from eating meat on that day of the week during Lent. The only kind of flesh they eat on Friday is fish, which is a symbol of Christ.

Even the Ash Wednesday practice of having one’s forehead signed with ashes has a biblical parallel. Putting ashes on one’s head was a common biblical expression of mourning (1 Sm 13:19, Est 4:1, Is 61:3; see also Est 4:3, Jer 6:26, Ez 27:30, Dn 9:3, Mt 11:21, Lk 10:13). By having the sign of the cross made with ashes on their foreheads, Catholics mourn Christ’s suffering on the cross and their own sins, which made that suffering necessary.

Active Catholic Women of Faith

What is Active Catholic Women of Faith

 

A small faith-sharing group that supports women to reconnect and strength their faith through prayer and reflection as they journey through life.

 

For Who

Women 35 plus who are single, married, divorced, practicing or non practicing. Open to all!

 

Size of Group

Suggested 3 to 6 women per group. If group becomes larger, you might consider reorganizing into a smaller group.

 

Where to Gather

You may gather wherever you feel comfortable and is agreeable to your group. ( Coffee shops, homes, etc.) You may rotate your gather place as you wish.

Below is what you need to get you started.

Active Catholic Women of Faith Brochure

How to Facilitate a group

How to plan a small group sharing agenda

Faith Sharing Resources

Free On-line resources